Dyson joins hands with FICCI to shed light on the subject of… well, dust!

The secret enemy lurking in your carpets that you didn’t even know about

There’s an odd sense of excitement around the latest Dyson products.

The Cyclone V10 Cordless vacuum cleaner and the Pure Cool air purifier have our full attention, not only for the tech that has gone in these dust busting machines, but also the associated findings from a survey conducted by FICCI Research and Analysis Centre (FRAC) that had us reeling in shock. Reckless as we are about our environment, our living space too doesn’t escape the miniscule claws of dust, highlighted by the studies shared by experts present at a recent event in New Delhi.

Hidden dust is a matter of great concern and initial findings from the ongoing research across Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore focuses and analyses the problem of hidden house dust across one hundred homes. Toxic pollutants are present indoors, and are inhaled continuously as we spend majority of our time indoors.

Dr Priyanka Kulshreshtha, Founding member of the Society for Indoor Environment claims, “PM2.5 are so small that when inhaled they can enter the bloodstream, and recent medical research indicates that it can cause degeneration of blood-brain barriers, leading to oxidative stress, neuro-inflammation and damage of neural tissue.” While there’s no denying the damage caused by increasing levels of pollution, throwing in some alarming numbers at us, she added, “Air pollution is linked to diseases and infections that kill around 600,000 children under 5 years of age per year[xxxvi]. Another study even shows that about 2.2 million school children in Delhi are growing up with irreversible lung damage which they will never recover [xxxvii].

Breaking down the subject of air pollution further, Dr. Mukesh Khare, an IIT Professor, author and Vice-President of the Society for Indoor Environment shared statistics from another survey, stating that more than 3.5 billion people – half of the world’s population – are exposed to unsafe air quality which also includes 75% of India’s population. An alarmingly high number, so to say.

According to the same survey, “Poor air quality is not restricted to Delhi, or metro cities alone. Smaller towns like Kanpur, Lucknow, Visakhapatnam and Surat also suffer from poor indoor and outdoor air quality.”

 

An independent and ongoing study conducted by Dyson and FICCI Research and Analysis Centre (FRAC) across Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore focuses and analyses the problem of hidden house dust across one hundred sample homes. Conclusively, 125 grams of dust (on an average) was collected per home from four areas in a house that included a carpet, a mattress, one sofa and a car after the apparent cleaning ritual was over. The captured dust indicated high levels of cockroach faeces, among other particles.

Conclusively, 125 grams of dust (on an average) was collected per home from four areas in a house that included a carpet, a mattress, one sofa and a car after the apparent cleaning ritual was over. The captured dust indicated high levels of cockroach faeces, among other particles.

Toxic pollutants are present indoors, and are inhaled continuously as we spend majority of our time indoors. Other than dust from regular sources, other sources of indoor pollutants are things as simple as the process of cooking Indian food .

A source of hope among this crisis, of course are the two products that aim to revolutionise the age-old cleaning process we Indians so firmly believe in. The Cyclone V10, spinning at a whooping 1,25,000rpm is the ultimate dirt-banishing tool. Say goodbye to traditional cleaning methods, because, according to Dyson experts, simple methose such as cleaning the dloor with a broom releases more particles in the air. And as is tradition, following up a brooming ritual with a wet mop only makes the dust settle in crevices of the floor... never really getting rid of it, making the entire routine a reduntant one. Club the Cyclone V10 with the Pure Cool air purifier, and fine dust isn’t likely to make its way to your respiratory tract.

 

But Dyson doesn’t just stop at killing mites and sucking up roach residue. The James Dyson Award was introduced to encourage young talent with fresh ideas from global engineering institutions and India got its first edition last year with more than 40 entries. This year, the response swelled up to almost a 100 entries from the country’s various IIT and other engineering colleges. Poring through the vast number of submissions were jury members Professor Ravi Mokashi Punekar who is a Product Design/ Industrial Design faculty at the Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Abhimanyu Nohwar, a product designer and founder of Kiba Design – a product and UX design company along with Stuff (India) Editor, Nishant Padhiar.

Ranging from bionic prosthetics to solar hygro-panels, the judges had their work cut out to pick a winner that met the tight criteria of the James Dyson Award. After a gruelling day of debates, arguments and altercations, the list emerged which ensure that the prototypes were based on innovative ideas that solved a real world problem. Just like how Dyson products address the need of the masses! More details and the winner shall be announced soon but since the process is still under embargo, we cannot reveal much. Stay tuned!