Home / Features / The 40 best Apple Watch apps (that we’re actually using)

The 40 best Apple Watch apps (that we’re actually using)

If you’re still figuring out what Apple Watch is really for, these great apps will help you find out

There are thousands of apps for Apple Watch. The tiny snag is that most of them aren’t much cop.

Some misunderstand how a wearable is best used, and demand you spend too long with your wrist in front of your face, while others only briefly impress. That’s not good enough for us. We want apps that are clever and well-designed – and also that we return to on a regular basis.

That, then, is what this list is all about: the best Apple Watch apps we’re actively using. On this page, you’ll find all-important health and exercise apps. Our other pages cover travel and essentials, productivity apps, and entertainment and games.

The best Apple Watch exercise and health apps

Get fitter through Apple’s little helper having you work out, run, and sleep more soundly.

Streaks Workout (£3.99)

Streaks Workout (£3.99)

This app broke a couple of the Stuff team, but we nonetheless heartedly recommend it for a quick calorie burn. All you need is your Apple Watch – Streaks Workout functions independently of the iOS app – and the will to work up a bit of a sweat.

You choose from four workout lengths (30 entirely suitably being dubbed ‘extreme’), and the app strings together simple exercises. When you’re done with a set of reps, you tap the screen. Easy. Except when your entire body is screaming at you for not initially going for the six-minute option.

Download Streaks Workout

Weigh up your options: Vekt

You can of course faff about with the Health app to inject your current heft into your Watch. Or just use the twiddly dials in Vekt (£1.99), which is much nicer. The app will show your target weight, too.

CARROT Fit (£4.99)

CARROT Fit (£4.99)

With trademark subtlety, CARROT Fit invites you to ‘7 minutes in hell’. You can customise exercise/break durations, but otherwise you’re at the whims of HAL 9000 reimagined as a fitness instructor.

Unlike CARROT’s iPhone incarnation, there’s no audible snark here, but familiar exercises still get amusingly oddball names – push-ups become ‘Kowtows to Cthulhu’, and wall-sits are the ‘Invisible Iron Throne’. Although how amused you’ll be at the end of your seven minutes, when you’re all aching and sweaty, remains to be seen.

Download CARROT Fit

Head over heels: Start With Yoga

Want to try yoga, but fear getting bent out of shape? Then check out Start With Yoga (£2.99). It keeps things simple, beaming pics of positions to your wrist, which you then attempt for user-defined intervals.

WorkOutDoors (£5.99)

WorkOutDoors (£5.99)

There are loads of workout apps for Apple Watch, but WorkOutDoors does something the others don’t: maps. On your wrist, you get a vector-based map that can be zoomed, panned or rotated. It’s like someone stuck a tiny iPhone in an Apple Watch case.

And its ambition doesn’t stop there. There are loads of features that show what can be done when you’re aiming to make more than an iPhone app’s sidekick: breadcrumb trails; multi-coloured speed/elevation/heart-rate trails; alternate layouts and zones; compass support; tons of data options; and POIs to help you navigate your way to the nearest pub. (Well, you need a reward after all that exercise, right?)

Download WorkOutDoors

Take a breath: Air Matters

Getting outdoors to exercise is great – unless the air has it in for you. Air Matters (free) surfaces air quality data in a manner beyond any weather app. We particularly like the complication that displays risk ratings for a specific allergen, to help you avoid becoming a sneeze monster.

Strava (free + IAP)

Strava (free + IAP)

Rather simpler in scope than WorkOutDoors, Strava goes for a more traditional companion app. You get a giant ‘start’ button, and then stats (time/distance/heart-rate) as you blaze about the place on your bike or on foot.

Given that Strava’s been able to work without an Apple Watch for some time now, it’s one of the more reliable efforts on the platform. The tiny snag is that it gives your battery a bit of a kicking. Still, all the more reason for you to pick up the pace a bit.

Download Strava

Watch to 5K (£2.99)

Watch to 5K (£2.99)

Getting your bum off the sofa is one thing. Being able to jog 5K without your knees collapsing is another. Watch to 5K eases you towards that goal. You do three runs a week, gradually building up how long sessions are and reducing how much walking time’s involved. In the end, you’ll be able to run 5km in under half an hour. All the number crunching happens right on your Apple Watch, meaning you don’t have to lug your iPhone around or figure out how to shove it inside your day-glo lycra running gear.

Download Watch to 5K

Jog on: RunKeeper

Once off the couch and 5King, Runkeeper (£free + IAP) will keep you honest. Your watch’s GPS will build a map of your runs too – so beware of sneaky bakery pit-stops you don’t want anyone to discover.

Moodistory (£4.99)

Moodistory (£4.99)

Your Apple Watch encourages you to track and protect your health — steps; stands; hearing. But Moodistory tries something different, inviting you to keep tabs on your mood.

Naturally, this is quite subjective, but the app keeps things simple, asking you to rate how you’re feeling, thereby gradually building up a picture of your mood over time.

It’s possible, even on Apple Watch, to add basic notes to entries, and check how your mood’s changed during the past two weeks. On iPhone, you can dig deeper into your data.

Download Moodistory

Standland (free + IAP)

Standland (free + IAP)

If you feel your Apple Watch telling you to get off your behind once every hour isn’t sufficient motivation, you might enjoy Standland. The app has similar intent to Apple’s nagging, but rewards your heroic activity by dishing out adorable collectable creatures.

Any activity lasting at least one minute during an hour is counted, maxing out at 24 per day. Before long, you’ll have a tiny owl or little bunny to gawp at, which can romp around 3D AR environments back on your iPhone. Just take care to not die of a cute overdose.

Download Standland

ActivityTracker Pedometer (£free)

ActivityTracker Pedometer (£free)

If you’re into walking at pace with your Apple kit, hoofing it to a better you, Apple’s Activity gives you stats – but ActivityTracker Pedometer gives you better stats.

More specifically, it immediately shows your steps count (rather than Apple’s vague ‘move’ goal), alongside distance and calorie-burn readings. Twiddle the digital crown and you get a breakdown of whether you stepped to it (so to speak) earlier in the day and week too.

Download ActivityTracker Pedometer

Heart Analyzer (£free + IAP)

Heart Analyzer (£free + IAP)

There’s a Heart Rate app built right into your Apple Watch, but Heart Analyzer allows you to dig deeper into your thumpiest of organs.

After you’ve performed a bout of exercise, you can peruse wiggly lines, showing how your heart rate changed over time. The app logs averages over the past week, and you can even set a massive graph as a complication.

Overkill? For some. But if you’re sporty, Heart Analyzer seems a good bet for keeping track of what your ticker’s up to.

Download Heart Analyzer

Wakeout (£4.99 per month)

Wakeout (£4.99 per month)

You’re at your desk and feel achy. But there’s no way you can exercise, right? Wrong! Wakeout’s cunning plan is to inject tiny bouts of physical activity into your day. On iPhone, you’ll get a schedule. But on Apple Watch, it’s more a question of selecting a context, watching a brief animation of a randomly selected relevant exercise, and then performing it for a short period until your wrist buzzes and tells you to stop. At a fiver a month (albeit for the whole family), the Apple Watch app alone might not convince you to subscribe; but as a complete package, it’s a solid deal – and you get a seven-day trial to make up your mind.

Download Wakeout

The best Apple Watch essentials and travel apps

Everyday essentials you need to install, along with apps that ensure you won’t get lost at home or abroad.

CARROT Weather (£free + IAP)

CARROT Weather (£free + IAP)

Apple’s weather app places forecast data around a dial. It doesn’t scan well. CARROT does a lot better, with a minimalist take on its superb iPhone app, delivering data-dense forecasts with a dollop of snark. You’ll helpfully be told it “sucks to be you” if it’s about to chuck it down – or that it’s “a bit moony” on a cold, clear night.

The big plus of CARROT Weather, though, is its customisation capabilities. On iPhone, this means you can rework the interface however you see fit. On Apple Watch, its power is in complications, with you being able to have it take over a face, like a wrist-based combination of Siân Lloyd and HAL-9000. You’ll need subscription IAP for a bunch of the Apple Watch features, note – but it’s well worth splashing out.

Download CARROT Weather

Get set: Solar Watch Sunrise Sunset

If your main concern with the elements is when it will be light (photographer!) or dark (possible vampire!), Solar Watch Sunrise Sunset (£free + optional IAP) is a great bet. Define locations on your iPhone and you can get glanceable daylight graphs on your Apple Watch – even as watch face complications.

Citymapper (£free)

Citymapper (£free)

On the iPhone, Citymapper is fantastic, giving you point-to-point directions for a range of supported cities, and location-based public transport details and alerts. The Apple Watch app is equally good, offering rapid access to favourite places, and information about nearby trains, buses, ferries and more.

Journey steps are clearly outlined, providing all the assistance you need, such as times of upcoming trains, stops on your route, and tiny maps that link through to Apple’s Maps app. We just wish it could somehow magically work for every town and city in the world rather than just the handful of (mainly) capitals it’s currently set up for.

Download Citymapper

Foursquare (£free)

Foursquare (£free)

The Foursquare mobile app long ago pivoted from telling the entire world where you were to finding out great places to go – far more useful. But when you’re hungry and in a strange city, you probably don’t want to be waggling your expensive smartphone about.

Fortunately, Foursquare for Apple Watch does the business. You can quickly get at the best tips for your current location, search for other options, and get at salient details regarding whatever you’re currently looking at. And if you don’t want to miss somewhere special, have the app ping you a notification when you’re passing by.

Download Foursquare

Shop it to ’em: Find Near Me

If Foursquare doesn’t locate what you need, there’s a good chance Find Near Me (£free) will. Its categories include everything from cafés to zoos, and you can tap entries to peruse reviews, phone numbers and handy directions.

PB: Lost Phone Alert for Watch (£4.99)

PB: Lost Phone Alert for Watch (£4.99)

Apple’s Find My is great, but a better bet would be to avoid losing your gadgets in the first place. With PB (‘Phone Buddy’), you can define alerts that have your iPhone shriek for its life should you wander off and abandon it – and the same for your Apple Watch.

Fortunately, there are plenty of set-up options, meaning you can define how far you must go before everything starts blaring, and turn off alerts when on home Wi-Fi, so your iPhone doesn’t deafen everyone nearby when you head to the kitchen for a biscuit.

Download Phone Buddy

iTranslate (£free + IAP)

iTranslate (£free + IAP)

Although it’s not quite like having a tiny translator taped to your wrist, iTranslate can quickly find translations for whatever you utter (or scribble) into it; and it can also speak (through your Apple Watch) to help with pronunciation.

Go ‘pro’ (a month costs £4.99) and you can use an offline mode on your phone. The app also has a clever Complication, which shows a greeting for the current time of day, and displays previous translations when you twiddle the Digital Crown to use the watchOS Time Travel feature.

Download iTranslate

Elk (free + £3.99 IAP)

Elk (free + £3.99 IAP)

When you’re overseas, it’s never good when you get currency conversions wrong and later discover you spent a month’s wages on a pair of socks. Elk puts conversions right on your wrist, reducing the likelihood of expensive mistakes.

Even better: this app’s properly thought about how you interact with Apple Watch. There’s no fiddly keypad for entering data – instead, you twiddle the Digital Crown to adjust numbers, and swipe to increment available digits.

Download Elk

All change: Currency

If you fancy something a bit more traditional than Elk, check out Currency (£free). Set up a currencies list on your iPhone, and it’ll appear on your Watch. You can then use a simple calculator to adjust values, and instantly get conversions.

Deliveries (£4.99 per year)

Deliveries (£4.99 per year)

We’ve a sneaking suspicion the average Stuff reader buys quite a lot of amazing kit. The problem is, when you purchase something online, you don’t want an expensive gadget hanging about on your doorstep all day – or unceremoniously hurled over your fence.

Deliveries gives you a fighting chance of being there to meet your latest package. Tracked shipments are displayed alongside a countdown that details when it’ll arrive. Depending on the shipper, you may even get to see on a little map where your box of goodies is as it wings its way towards your home.

Download Deliveries

Pennies (£3.99)

Pennies (£3.99)

In our experience, pennies aren’t so much the problem when it comes to budgeting – pounds are (and often, lots of them). If you get to the end of the month and wonder where all your money went, weld Pennies to your wrist.

You set up lists, allocate a budget, and then input values when you spend or receive some cash. And if you want to be constantly guilted by your Apple Watch, Pennies can show your ongoing budget as a Complication.

Download Pennies

MultiTimer (£free)

MultiTimer (£free)

Although Apple’s Timer has a moniker in the singular, it does in fact store multiple timers – including custom ones. However, they’re devoid of context, and you can only run one at once. Not so with MultiTimer.

Set up your timers in the iPhone app, and each is then displayed on your Apple Watch with a colour, label and icon. You can run as many timers as you like, and their progress is seamlessly synced across devices.

Download MultiTimer

The best Apple Watch productivity apps

You won’t be firing up Office on your wrist any time soon, but your Apple Watch can still help you work.

Just Press Record (£4.99)

Just Press Record (£4.99)

The idea behind Just Press Record is to make capturing voice memos insanely simple. On Apple Watch, the app starts off as a massive record button. Prod it to start recording. When you’re done, the recording lurks on your Apple Watch until it next connects to your iPhone, at which point it transfers, and is even automatically transcribed. Easy – and something Apple’s own Voice Memos app doesn’t do.

Using the Apple Watch app, you can also peruse and playback recent recordings. The only snag is there’s no background playback, so it’s best for shortish memos. Still, that’s a small niggle when using it makes you feel like you’re living in a trashy sci-fi flick.

Download Just Press Record

Make your mark: Noted

As a combination notepad/voice memos app, Noted (£free + IAP) also has something to offer over Apple’s equivalents. Tap # during recording and a ‘TimeTag’ bookmark is added to your saved file. During playback on iPhone, you can then jump to these specific moments, adding contextual notes around them as necessary.

FlickType (£1.99)

FlickType (£1.99)

When you want to send a message using your Apple Watch, Apple forces you to dictate your words in a self-conscious manner, or use Scribble to enter characters one by one. FlickType reasons that history already taught us a keyboard is the best way to enter text.

You’d think the Apple Watch screen too diddy for a keyboard to work. You’d be wrong. Swiping across FlickType and using the Digital Crown to switch words or emoji makes us wish Apple would immediately steal the entire concept and weld it to watchOS.

Download FlickType

Fantastical (£4.99 per month)

Fantastical (£4.99 per month)

It feels a bit odd to recommend an app primarily for one feature, but here we are. For reasons beyond us, Calendar on Apple Watch still lacks the means to create new entries. By contrast, Fantastical’s been able to do so for ages.

Much like the iPhone version, Fantastical for Apple Watch has some natural-language smarts, meaning you can say something like “lunch with Mark next Wednesday at 12 for 2 hours” and the event will be correctly created. Beyond that… well, it’s a calendar for your Apple Watch, although a good-looking and snappy one.

Download Fantastical

Look forwards: Countdowns

Calendars and reminder apps are fine, but Countdowns (£free) gives you a bespoke space to house important dates – and how long away they are. You edit the list on your iPhone, and there are loads of handy customisation options. You’ll never miss a date again – unless you forget to add it to the app. So don’t do that.

Cheatsheet Notes (£free + £4.99 IAP)

Cheatsheet Notes (£free + £4.99 IAP)

If you don’t need the security of 1Password but still fancy quick access to bite-sized notes (such as Wi-Fi passwords and door combinations), Cheatsheet Notes is an excellent download. Each tiny information nugget comprises a piece of text and custom icon, and cheats can be synced from the iPhone app (assuming you buy the one-off ‘unlock everything’ IAP).

You can also edit, create and organise (into folders) new cheats directly on Apple Watch (by way of dictation), along with using one of these notes as a complication. Just don’t make it your credit card PIN, eh?

Download Cheatsheet Notes

Drafts (£free)

Drafts (£free)

Weirdly, Notes has yet to make its way across to Apple Watch, but fortunately Drafts ably fills that particular void. The app enables you to capture new notes by dictation, which are then hurled into your Drafts inbox. Alternatively, you can append or prepend whatever you input to an existing note – for example, to update a diary or shopping list.

If you don’t fancy talking at your Apple Watch, you can use the watchOS Scribble feature to write notes instead. Also, your inbox is browsable and your notes are readable on you Apple Watch, saving you from having to keep heading to your iPhone.

Download Drafts

Word up: LookUp

On iPhone, LookUp (£5.99) is a dictionary that’s friendly, colourful and fun – not words you’d expect to find in the same sentence, granted. The Apple Watch app is similarly impressive, enabling you to get countless definitions right on your wrist, and access a word of the day, thereby expeditiously ameliorating your vocabulary.

Halide Mark II (£2.49 per month or £44.99)

Halide Mark II (£2.49 per month or £44.99)

If you’re a serious iPhone photographer, you’ve probably already got Halide installed. If not, you should have – it’s a superb, premium, feature-rich app that unlocks the full potential of your Apple smartphone’s snapper.

Naturally, the Apple Watch app can’t magic up an Apple Watch camera. But it can provide a live preview of what your iPhone’s camera can see – useful when taking a photo with your arm stretched aloft, or when using the main camera for a selfie. Prod the shutter button to take a snap, or set off the timer to give everyone a few seconds to get their best smile on.

Get Halide Mark II

Remote control: Filmic Pro

Much like Halide, Filmic Pro (£12.99) gives you a live preview of what your iPhone can see – only this time you’re shooting video. You get one remote-control button, to start and stop recording – in stark contrast to the dizzying array of iPhone app controls!

Streaks (£4.99)

Streaks (£4.99)

Like Productive, Streaks wants to infuse habits into your daily routine. However, this is a pay-once app – not a subscription – and has a kind of ruthless efficiency that Productive lacks.

Here, you’re encouraged to limit yourself to just six habits (although up to 12 are supported). The interface is restricted to icons depicting your habits, which you prod when a task is completed – unless it’s a timer, in which case a tap sets it going. Reminders can also be sent your way as relevant.

It might seem reductive at first, but the app’s blunt nature works, keeping you focused on your tasks.

Download Streaks

BFT – Bear Focus Timer (£1.99)

BFT - Bear Focus Timer (£1.99)

On iPhone, Bear Focus Timer is superb for keeping focused on tasks by breaking the day into work and break sprints. The Apple Watch app puts a similar system right on your wrist.

By default, you get 25 minutes to work and five to rest, whereupon a motivational bear picture is shown. Every four sprint pairs, you get a longer break, and all these values can be defined in-app. To further aid concentration you can also have noise loops piped into your lugholes — assuming you’ve connected some wireless headphones.

Download BFT – Bear Focus Timer

Break it up: Focus

If you want a full-on time-logging system rather than just a timer, try Focus (£free + £4.49 per month). It’ll keep you honest while totting up the time you spend working, providing insight into where your time goes.

Watchsmith (£free + IAP)

Watchsmith (£free + IAP)

There are two sides to Watchsmith. The first is the app, which is like a Swiss army knife. Open it and you’ll find mini-apps for weather forecasts, workouts, timezone conversion and calendars; there are even a few games to faff about with.

But the app’s biggest differentiator is its complications. These are configured on your iPhone and can be defined to cycle through multiple functions. So you could use just one slot to show your weather forecast in the morning, activity during a daily workout session, a calendar when at work, and astronomy at night.

IAP’s required to unlock some functions, but the base app is free. It’s well worth a look to demonstrate the scope of complications and how your Apple Watch can benefit from its display being more dynamic beyond the Siri face.

Download Watchsmith

PCalc (£9.99)

PCalc (£9.99)

If you’ve fond memories of calculator watches, you’re probably a) quite old and b) not going to be convinced about using a calculator app on Apple Watch. Because frankly, doing so is a mite fiddly.

Still, PCalc is the best of them. The buttons are chunky, and operators can be got at with a long tap or prodded on a second screen. The app also includes a handy third screen for conversions. It defaults to tips, but you can spin the Digital Crown to get at units for all kinds of things, including functions.

Note that freebie PCalc Lite offers similar functionality to massive cheapskates.

Download PCalc

Morpho Converter (£free)

Morpho Converter (£free)

On iPhone, this conversions app is all about efficiency and speed. You define a bunch of conversions, tap out a number and then see all of the answers at once. On Apple Watch, you cannot add any new conversions to your favourites, but you do get your existing iPhone list right on your wrist. A calculator interface lets you punch in new figures, colours usefully differentiate unit types, a ‘reverse’ button enables you to instantly swap converted units around, and there’s a complication to put a specific conversion on your favourite watch face. For free, you’re limited to a handful of custom list items. That restriction can be removed with a 49p per month or one-time £14.99 payment.

Download Morpho Converter

Count on it: Clicker

When you merely need to count rather than convert, there’s Clicker (£free). A big number on the screen increments every time you tap. Easy.

The best Apple Watch entertainment apps and games

When it’s time to unwind, make use of that thing on your wrist. Some Apple Watch games are surprisingly good, too.

Chirp for Twitter (£free + £2.99)

Chirp for Twitter (£free + £2.99)

Perhaps you don’t want to plough through a Twitter feed using a tiny screen strapped to your wrist, but Chirp gives you that ability anyway. More usefully, it gives you access to all the messaging bits of Twitter as well.

This means you can check out mentions and delve into direct messages, retweeting and replying right from your Apple Watch. And if you’re a bit self-obsessed, you can favourite all those mentions too. (This is assuming you pay the one-off ‘pro’ IAP. Skinflints mostly only get to view rather than use Twitter with Chirp!)

Download Chirp for Twitter

WristBook: Messenger

If you’ve friends who no longer know how to communicate by anything other than Facebook, Messenger (£free) puts the chat bit on your wrist. It’s like living in a Star Trek future, only one in which everyone uses emoji to express themselves, having decided the written word is no longer enough.

Onefootball (£free)

Onefootball (£free)

On mobile, Onefootball is a a one-stop-shop for all things footie, offering news, telly, scores, results, and enough stats to choke the entire Match of the Day research team. On Apple Watch, it’s mostly a wrist-based companion to fill you with anticipation and terror when it goes ‘ding’.

This is because goal alerts are fed to your Apple Watch, meaning if you’re not able to sit in front of the telly when your favourite team’s playing, you can at least keep up with how well – or badly – things are going.

Download Onefootball

Sundial (free + £6.99)

Sundial (free + £6.99)

Many apps advise when the sun and moon are due to make an appearance. Sundial gives you the finer details by way of multiple pages (‘widgets’) you swipe between. You get solar dials, pages that focus on the sun or moon, and an events page that manages to be an info dump and yet retain total clarity.

Everything’s customisable. You can add/remove widgets and rearrange their order, along with tweaking what information’s shown. And for when you don’t fancy delving into the app, Sundial provides a bunch of great-looking complications for your watch face.

Get Sundial

Heavens above: Night Sky

We’re in tech demo territory with Night Sky (free), but can’t fault its ambitions. Align your watch with the moon, prod said moon to confirm and you get a live map of the heavens, with constellations auto-selected as you move your arm around.

Overcast (£free)

Overcast (£free)

Apple’s Podcasts is on Apple Watch, enabling iPhone-free podcast bliss. But if you prefer using the iPhone’s best podcast app, Overcast, you’ll love its own Apple Watch app. It can act as a remote for whatever’s playing on your iPhone, but there’s a standalone mode as well, for podcasts Overcast syncs to your watch based on criteria you define.

The app’s design is refined and minimal, packing a lot into a small space. The main view provides fast access to settings and your podcasts list. When playing something, you can also use the Apple Watch app to adjust speed and skip chapters, thereby blazing past any boring bits. Bonus!

Download Overcast

WatchFunk (£3.99)

WatchFunk (£3.99)

This app bravely bridges the gap between ambitious and ridiculous by attempting to put a music studio right on your wrist. It’s not exactly GarageBand, but four quid gets you a dinky one-octave keyboard for smashing out riffs during dull moments.

Buttons let you change the octave you’re playing, and if the default piano sound doesn’t suit, you can switch to seven alternatives, including a synth and a trumpet. Should you be more rhythmically inclined, a final option is a six-pad drum kit.

WatchFunk isn’t going to make you the next Daft Punk, but it’s fun, usable and a better use of your time than trying to work through your emails on the Apple Watch’s tiny display.

Download WatchFunk

Name that tune: Shazam

Much like the phone version, Shazam (£free) for Apple Watch identifies any tune within earshot. Captured info can be fired to your iPhone via Handoff, or you can view lyrics on the screen – thrilling friends when you’ve had one too many but can still focus as far as your wrist and murder a classic.

Tiny Armies (99p)

Tiny Armies (99p)

Turn-based strategy on a PC with a big display makes sense. Your eyes might narrow a bit at the prospect of such games on a phone. But on an Apple Watch? Hang on a minute.

But Tiny Armies has a go anyway, and it’s surprisingly great with its stripped-back, lightning-fast battles on little chequerboard arenas enveloped in a fog of war.

The AI’s not exactly like a savage Civilization, but for some quickfire turn-based larks on your wrist, Tiny Armies does the job admirably.

Download Tiny Armies

Rules! (£2.99)

Rules! (£2.99)

On Apple Watch, Rules! is a devious, tightly focused memory test ideal for waking up your brain on a morning commute. Over ten rounds, you’re given rules (‘Tap ascending’, ‘Blue if you see red’) to apply to tiles featuring cute robots, monsters and other objects.

The smart bit is previous rules being referred to by number. When you’re at round eight but told to apply rule three, it’s easy to err, thereby ending your game and scuppering your daily target.

Download Rules!

Star Duster (99p)

Star Duster (99p)

Calling Star Duster our favourite Apple Watch game isn’t huge praise, given the competition. But what makes Star Duster properly stand out is it’s a good game, full stop. It echoes old-school LCD titles, with you twiddling the Digital Crown to have your servicebot zoom around the display, collecting space junk.

It looks and sounds lovely, like you’ve accidentally invoked a time travel app and been zapped back to 1982. But Star Duster isn’t done, because it does a lot with a little, providing real challenge as it ramps up the difficulty level with blocking walls and other servicebot-worrying hazards. Games are swift, but – unlike most Apple Watch fare – you’ll when defeated immediately want another blast.

Download Star Duster

Vesta Attack (£1.99)

Vesta Attack (£1.99)

A classic arcade cabinet on your wrist? Not quite, but Vesta Attack isn’t far off. It takes the classic Asteroids (obliterate space rocks; shoot deadly alien ships) and fashions something around the Digital Crown.

Twiddle that dial and your auto-firing ship spins. Power-ups occasionally appear, giving you a fighting chance of getting to the next level. One hit and you’re dead — and even ancient arcade games weren’t that harsh! Still, you do get two themes (classic and modern) and punchy sound effects when you fancy another go.

Download Vesta Attack

Dice by PCalc (£1.99)

Dice by PCalc (£1.99)

Instead of playing a game on your watch, Dice by PCalc helps you play games in the real-world, by way of lobbing virtual dice across a virtual table. From a visual standpoint, this is impressive stuff on Apple Watch, but flexibility is the real win.

In the options screen, you choose from a wide range of dice types – or complete sets to roll with a single tap. Your table can be cleared at any point, or you can gradually throw additional dice, while the app tots up what you’ve thrown and the overall score. Cheats can’t prosper here.

Download Dice by PCalc