Inside Intel: Check out Intel’s fancy new office in Singapore

What else is Intel working on? Read on to find out
Inside Intel: Check out Intel’s fancy new office in Singapore

Not many of us have had a chance to enter or see what goes on behind the closed doors of one of the biggest tech firms in the world. So, consider yourselves lucky because Intel’s just given us a sneak peek into its newest office in Singapore.

Located at the new Aperia Tower 2 in Kallang Avenue, the Intel office houses all of Intel under one roof. It was nothing short of impressive. Their pantries look like full sized kitchens we find in our homes, their workstations are equipped with the latest technologies and furnishings, and there’s even a recreation room for staff to wind down.

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Asia, the hub of growth

Inside Intel: Check out Intel’s fancy new office in Singapore
Inside Intel: Check out Intel’s fancy new office in Singapore
Inside Intel: Check out Intel’s fancy new office in Singapore

“The fact that we’re in this office says a lot about our presence in Singapore, and our commitment to Singapore, as well as the opportunities we see within this region,” Intel Malaysia and Singapore country manager, Sumner Lemon, said.

Besides showing off the new office, Lemon also took the opportunity to discuss some key projects the company will be working on in 2015.

For one, he mentioned that Intel will be increasing its focus on the wearable devices space. It’s recently inked partnerships with businesses like Fossil and Oakley (we’re guessing we’ll see a smartwatch and smart sunglasses respectively) to include its tiny processors on these devices.

Lemon also said he sees potential in the 3D printing and security space, which is why Intel’s invested heavily into its RealSense technology. According to him, the 3D camera could lend itself develop these technologies further than the capabilities they’ve got now.

And since Asia’s the hotbed for the growth of such developments, it’s no surprise that it’s focusing a great deal of its energy within this region.

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