4 of the biggest misconceptions about PEVs

Let us set the record straight on personal electric vehicles

There has been some discussion lately on whether PEVs such as e-scooters and e-bicycles should be banned on our streets. We’re talking about the recent video of an e-scooter rider overtaking a bus and the incident of a girl supposedly hit by a PEV, and other stories that all read the same way: should PEVs be banned?

Look, we know electric vehicles are new, and new things can be scary. But is there really good reason to support a ban, or heavy regulation, for these new vehicles that are relatively small in number?

Like it or not, PEVs are the future of city commutes and short-ranged personal transport. They are eco-friendly, cost effective, portable and relatively safe to use. Especially with global warming raising the temperatures year on year, PEVs help people to get around quickly without working up a sweat.

Since there seem to be quite a few misconceptions about electric vehicles and their use, we’re going to address some of them, and hopefully, change a few trepidatious minds on the topic of these scary magically powered moving platforms from the future.

PEVs are fast moving nuisances

Most electric bikes available in Singapore are limited to a top speed of 25km/h. E-scooters max out at 25-30km/h. Geared bicycles can easily go faster than that. So it is literally impossible for you to get hit by a PEV travelling at 50km/h. In fact, if you get hit by anything at that speed, you were probably standing in the middle of the road.

Most PEVs average around 10-15km/h in normal everyday use, slightly slower than a seasoned marathon runner. So if you don’t get breathy runners crashing into you while you walk home from work, you shouldn’t have to worry about getting knocked over by a E-unicycle.

PEVs are serious collision risks

Plus, electric scooters and electric bikes are relatively small and can come to a stop quickly. So accidents can be avoided easily, especially if their users are sensible and vigilant. Even if a PEV user were aiming to commit vehicular homicide with their electric vehicles, their victims could sidestep their mildly-speeding would-be murderers with ease.

PEVs are not the war rigs from Mad Max. In case nobody has noticed, PEV users are the most at risk of injury in the event of a crash: nobody is more afraid of an accident than a person standing more or less unprotected on a quick moving platform/wheel, with the occasional exception of a flimsy foam helmet and some pads.

If and when a PEV crashes into you hard enough to cause injury, the user will also most likely be in no shape to be running anywhere. 

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