3 golden rules for better selfies

AKA how to look good in self portraits and not end up looking like this douchebag pictured here
3 golden rules for better selfies

Let's face it: selfies have become a part of everyday life. Even if you don't take them yourselves, odds are you'll be pulled into a "wefie" whether you like it or not, so you might as well try to look as good as you can. 

From celebrities to CEOs, portrait photographer Wesley Loh has shot them all. Since we can't all afford to hire him to take photos of us, he shares his tips on how we can take better self portraits. 

Some viewers might find the following images disturbing, and as such we must apologise. We don't take selfies (for obvious reasons), which just goes to show that we're not psychotic.

Keep the angle high

3 golden rules for better selfies

Selfies are meant to be flattering, and shooting from below the chin or nose line can result in things like double chins. While shooting from a lower angle can result in hero shots that are more suitable for men, ladies might prefer shots from above, as they will make the eyes look bigger. Tilting your head downwards has the same effect. 

Picking a side

3 golden rules for better selfies

Almost everyone looks better on one side, because very few people have symmetrical faces. The best to way to find your good side is to take photos tilting your face in each direction, and comparing to see which you prefer. More often than not you'll find you look younger in one of them, and that's obviously the better one. As you can see in the example, my good side is the right side.

Work the angle

3 golden rules for better selfies

If you find you look better facing right, try to accentuate it in your photos. You can do this by making sure the light is coming from that direction (in this case, the right) when taking your selfie, and/or ensuring your face is tilted slightly towards it so you can see the outline of your cheek and jaw clearer. 

And that's all there is to it! Remember to use your newfound selfie powers for good, not evil.