The second generation Honda NSX is a lightweight, high-tech speed machine for modern petrolheads

Reborn 550bhp hybrid supercar breaks cover and melts hearts at the Detroit motor show
The second gen Honda NSX is a lightweight, high-tech speed machine

Either I've got a serious case of déjà vu or I've seen this before?

Your mind-melting memory issues could be working on two levels: the original Honda NSX - an all-aluminium mid-engine sportscar - took the world by storm in the mid 1990s and even stole the heart of a certain Ayrton Senna. You could also be mistaking the latest iteration for the 2012 Acura NSX Concept, which looked shockingly similar to what you see in front of you. But this is the final, production version of Honda's latest sports car... we promise.

But isn't that an Acura badge on the front?

Yes it is, but ignore that because Acura is just Honda's fancy badge that it likes to stick to American things. When it comes to the UK, it will wear a Honda badge.

Alright, alright. But what's all the fuss about anyway?

The second generation NSX been in the making for more than three years, so now that it's finally here, you really need to get pumped!

Pumped?

Seriously, it's a 550bhp rocket that's not only powered by a mid-mounted V6 engine (like all good performance machines) but that also benefits from two electric motors that are bolted to the front wheels, plus an additional motor at the rear for extra shove. The result is 'instantaneous' torque and ridiculously big grins on driver's faces.

Production version retains the concept's shape looks
Production version retains the concept's shape looks
Production version retains the concept's shape looks

Wasn't the old NSX a bit of a weapon around the track?

Too right, it could positively spank more expensive supercars around any circuit when placed in the right hands. The latest iteration looks set to be a bit of a demon too, as it features a trick torque vectoring system, brilliantly labelled Super-Handling All-Wheel-Drive, which is aided by the electric motors.

What on earth does that mean? 

Basically, the electric motors in the front wheels can provide different levels of torque depending on the levels of grip, helping wannabe racers around corners. It's also bolstered by a bunch of chassis modes that can transform the new NSX from comfy cruiser into all-out racer at the press of a button.

A bit like a mini-Porsche 918 Spyder, then?

Sort of. It can silently cruise around on battery power alone for short distances, much like the aforementioned Porker, and it has wheels but that's where the similarities end. Even though Honda is yet to release official performance details, we can guarantee it won't be as fast as the 918.

TFT displays replace old-school instruments

That's a shame...

It is but consider this: the Honda NSX is set to cost around £100,000 when the order books open in the summer. That's £525,000 cheaper than a Porsche 918 Spyder, which is great whichever way you look at it.

What is it like inside?

Honda engineers will tell you this is a 'human-centred supercar'. We don't know what that actually means but we can tell you it features dynamic TFT displays rather than analogue instrument binnacles, which change depending on the driving mode. There's also a centre-mounted screen that takes car of the infotainment system. Unfortunately, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility are yet to be confirmed.

OK, you've convinced us. We're 'pumped'.

Glad to hear it.