Ping G15 golf clubs - hands on

I've recently had my calloused mits gripped round Ping's latest game-improvement clubs. Golf clubs don't come much more technologically advanced than

I've recently had my calloused mits gripped round Ping's latest game-improvement clubs. Golf clubs don't come much more technologically advanced than the Ping G15 range, which claims to offer increased forgiveness on dodgy strikes and helping players get the ball into the air.

The G15 line consists of irons, utility clubs, fairway woods and a driver. Starting at the small end, the G15 irons are typically Ping-like, but even more so. They have a familiar matt finish and chunky heads, but with the peripheral weighting around the back protruding more than ever - that's how Ping has maximised the sweet spot and made it easier to get the ball airbourne. 

If you're used to compact, traditional irons, you might find the G15s unnervingly chunky and the soles so wide that you might not be confident of picking the ball off the turf. However, for beginners or anyone stepping up from similar cavity-back irons, that won't be a problem.

But do they deliver? They're certainly the most forgiving irons I've used, and felt great on impact. They didn't quite offer the distance of the Callaway FT irons or the feel of the old forged Mizuno MX-23 irons they were directly compared to, but gave a decent compromise between the two and didn't punish mishits so badly.

Next up were the utility and fairway woods, which proved the real stars of the range. Both produced a high, long flight and were superb at sweeping the ball off the grass. The top of the utility clubs' heads give the appearance of being iron-like, which somehow made me feel more confident of getting properly under the ball.

The G15 driver has a full-on 460cc titanium head, which produces an awesome thwack on impact and looks huge sat behind the ball - like you couldn't possibly mishit it. Tried alongside the Callaway FT-9, the Ping G15 driver hit the ball longer and sounded just so much better - the FT-9 carbon/titanium composite head sounds dead by comparison.

All in all, a great new range from Ping - particularly the excellent woods, which will be appreciated by beginners and advanced players alike. Driver £250, fairway woods £180 each, utility clubs £135 each, irons £80 each (steel shaft).

I've also been playing with the new Motocaddy S3 Digital electric golf trolley - more on that soon.