Navpix drives onto Nokia smartphones

Owners of Series 60 smartphones already had plenty to be smug about, and now Navman’s just made them insufferably happy by announcing a sat-nav bundle

Owners of Series 60 smartphones already had plenty to be smug about, and now Navman’s just made them insufferably happy by announcing a sat-nav bundle that brings its NavPix tech to mobiles for the first time.

The (deep breath) Mobile Travel Assist S60 Edition packs NAVTEQ’s maps onto a miniSD card - you get the choice of 512MB UK & Ireland or 1GB Western Europe cards – and couples it with a Bluetooth GPS receiver.

As you can see above, there are two GPS widgets. The lollipop-shaped B20 doesn’t have a battery and is powered solely by your cigarette lighter, while the B10 is a more conventional self-powered unit that you can carry around with you.

The kit serves up all the usual sat-nav treats that you’d find on a dedicated GPS device including a speedy Sirf Star III chipset, real-time traffic reports and over 1.25 million Points of Interest, but the really cool feature is the NavPix tech.

Like the iCN750 navigator, it attaches photos taken with your camphone with the destinations GPS co-ordinates and turns them into ‘NavPix’. Having the feature on a mobile, though, takes it to another level: you can, for example, take a picture of a restaurant you’re in, text it to a fellow NavPix user and they’ll get directed straight there, even dodging traffic jams on the way.

If you’re planning to be a bewildered tourist in a major European city this autumn, you’ll also be pleased to hear that Navman has teamed up with Lonely Planet and made some handy downloadable Navpix’s that feature the series’ expert info.

Visit its site now and you’ll find hundreds of tourist haunts for cities such as Paris, Milan and Madrid, which you can suck down your broadband connection for free.   

Essentials

Navman Mobile Travel Assist S60 Edition

Price: UK & Ireland £170, Western Europe £200

On sale: September 19th

Contact: Navman

Related stories:

Navman invents sat-nav-by-pictures