Naked tech – toys laid bare

 As gadget-lovers we're surrounded by shiny, polished tech that is carefully (most of the time) crafted to look and work just right. The guts and

As gadget-lovers we're surrounded by shiny, polished tech that is carefully (most of the time) crafted to look and work just right. The guts and gears that make it all function are hidden away so we don't have to worry our pretty little heads about it.I spent my early childhood dissecting ailing tech with the mistaken belief that I would be able to put it back together, and even that it might work when I had done so. Needless to say it would always descend into a flat-pack furniture scenario with plenty of important looking pieces left over, and a toy that was beyond resuscitation.What I loved about the process was feeling like I had been let in on a secret, and that I had an idea (mechanically, if not electronically) of what was going below the surface.That's why I love Matt Kirkland's systematic dissection of a series of robotic toys and the exposure of their secrets.Once mercilessly skinned, the resulting robo-skeletons range from the curiously pathetic to the downright scary. A strange collection of innocuous plastic boxes, articulated arms, eyes and tufts of polyester fur. There's a singing, swaying Gizmo (from Gremlins) in the office that has no idea what's coming...