The iPhone is boring: official

[intro]Despite Apple's best efforts, boring third-party software has made its way onto the iPhone. The finger-flicking party's over, people - it's tim

[intro]Despite Apple's best efforts, boring third-party software has made its way onto the iPhone. The finger-flicking party's over, people - it's time to work! [/intro]

 

 

Apple's been heavily criticised for not allowing third-party apps onto the iPhone. But not by me – I like the polished, fun-to-use Apple apps. You can keep your clunky java-powered biorhythm analysers. There, I said it.

To placate the mod-bothering brigade, Apple imbued the iPhone's Safari web browser with (some) web 2.0 compatibility, and suggested that third-party developers can develop web applications for the iPhone rather than on-board apps. That'll scupper the development of grotty calorie counters and spreadsheets, right?

Wrong. I've just had an email plop into my inbox (from the wonderfully named Bill Gram-Reefer at Worldview PR) telling me that LiveTime is delivering ITIL Service Management and Help Desk to Enterprise via iPhone. I don't understand what that means, and I don't want to understand. What is clear is that iPhone has begun its move from fun, party phone to work tool, and this makes me very, very sad.

After all, I haven't even got one yet. By the time iPhone arrives in the UK, my IT department will be telling me how I can constantly monitor my budgets on it. When all I want is to browse for funny You Tube videos. Sigh.

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