Instant Expert: Bluejacking

Bluejacking has been with us for a couple of years, but this week saw the first instance of Blackjacking (installing malicious software onto Blackberr

Bluejacking has been with us for a couple of years, but this week saw the first instance of Blackjacking (installing malicious software onto Blackberries in order to hack into corporate servers). What better time to deliver Stuff's Instant Expert guide to Bluetooth hacking?

Five things you need to know about Bluejacking:

1) Bluejacking is the practice of anonymously sending files to strangers via the wireless technology Bluetooth. These usually take the form of abusive text messages or pornographic movies, and are sent over short distances such as on buses and trains.

2) Bluetooth security means that you have to manually accept any incoming messages, so incoming movie or image files can easily be deflected. In order to get around this, skilled Bluejackers create a new address book entry with an abusive message, then send that to nearby Bluetooth users. When they received the address book v card, they'll still be prompted to accept or decline - but the message will be clearly visible either way.

2) Bluespamming is the commercial equivalent of Bluejacking - Channel 4's recent publicity campaign for 4 Docs, for example, involved a Bluetooth transmitter built into a poster, which sent short films to anyone passing by. Unfortunately, they weren't pornographic.

3) Blackjacking is Bluejacking for Blackberries (pictured above) - and, in particular, using a malicious game to get access to corporate networks through the increasingly popular portable emailer.

5) If you want to avoid being Bluejacked or Blackjacked, simply turn off Bluetooth, or make your phone undiscoverable.