CES - Near-Field photo frame heralds the end of Bluetooth pairing

Wireless fanatics rejoice - Parrot has cured the headache of Bluetooth pairing. The French Bluetooth specialists were proudly showing off a prototy

Wireless fanatics rejoice - Parrot has cured the headache of Bluetooth pairing. The French Bluetooth specialists were proudly showing off a prototype Bluetooth photo display that allows you to send a picture from a mobile simply by tapping the phone on the frame.

The frame uses Near-Field Communication (NFC) technology, which is similar to Oyster Cards and other RFID systems and allows you to pair the devices without needing to go through the phone's menu system.

Near Field Communication is built into the new Bluetooth 2.1 specification, and is already used by a couple of mobile phones including the Nokia 6131NFC (pictured above).

NFC technology isn't new, having been used in a number of cashless payment trials, but only now is its potential being tapped - Sony uses a related technology in its prototype TransferJet cable-replacement system that allows movies and pictures to be moved from a camera to a computer without the need for USB.

Parrot has also adapted its Bluetooth audio systems to use NFC, making it easier to stream music from a phone to a speaker.

Sadly, Parrot's NFC products are unlikely to come to market until 2009. In the meantime we'll have to hope the company's MMS photoframe - which allows you to send picture messages to photo frames anywhere in the world - makes it to the UK.

Watch out for our video of Parrot's NFC frame, and check out the rest of our live CES 2008 coverage.