Airvana Femto Family Tablet software explained

 Femtocells isn't a term that gets propelled around Stuff.tv too often. So if your expression currently reads 'vacant', this bit of learning is f

Femtocells isn't a term that gets propelled around Stuff.tv too often. So if your expression currently reads 'vacant', this bit of learning is for you. Firstly, it's not biological, despite the connotations. A femtocell is a low-powered base station (or mobile phone access point) enabling you to use your phone via a broadband connection. So essentially, service providers can extend coverage indoors or to other places access would otherwise be limited or unavailable (like parts of Stuff Towers). Great if you live/work/hang out in places with no windows and rubbish coverage. OK, boring bit over. The point of that mini science lesson was to give you a bit of an understanding of the technology behind the Airvana Femto Family Tablet. So what is it? Well, it's essentially a multimedia portal for family or household communications and sharing. Its primary concern is keeping you connected, both at home and remotely via your mobile. Not in the mood for reading? Check out our video demo.

Despite what the name implies, there's no hardware - that'll be the job of third party manufacturers. This means the software is potentially compatible with any touchscreen device, be it iPad or a mahoosive all-in-one like Medion's The Touch. Once you've set up your private network, known as the femtozone, your phone will automatically sync with your personal portal once you're within range.

Features range from syncing calendars, to location notifications, network based customised homescreens, to automatic photo uploads from your phone to the tablet, as well as Facebook (Flickr and Picassa are options too). Of course, if you like to do questionable things with your cameraphone, it's probably best to keep this feature switched off.