Bumble app aims to be a less shallow, less douchebag-friendly Tinder

Former Tinder employees claim it'll help ward off unwanted messages
Bumble app aims to be a less shallow, less douchebag-friendly Tinder

Former Tinder employee Whitney Wolfe, who sued Tinder, claiming harassment and being discriminated at work, has decided to one-up her former bosses with an app that promises that you'll "never get unwanted messages". 

Of course you can't fail to see the snide asides at Wolfe's former employer as Bumble is marketed as being better at serving non-"dead-end matches" on "other, more shallow apps."

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Bumble app aims to be a less shallow, less douchebag-friendly Tinder

After media attention from Techcrunch, Bumble's kept things on the down low and not revealed much outside the launch date - 1 December. Besides Wolfe, there are two other former Tinder employees involved with the app, namely Chris Gulczynski and partner Sarah Mick.

Obviously there wasn't a non-competition clause in Wolfe's contract. That aside, it's rich that the app is claiming to be less shallow when there are fewer things shallower than dating apps, especially ones that seem to place a high premium on looks as Bumble seems to.

Note the toothsome models and idealised relationship in the app promo where the man is a young, but obviously upwardly mobile investment banker while the woman is a nubile intern at a fashion magazine.

Bumble would be better off marketing itself to women as an app where creepy dudes won't be able to message them so easily, presumably because you would need to out who you are and where you work.

Anonymity isn't always a deterrent though, so unless they invent an app that electroshocks men who won't take no for an answer, Bumble will have to do more to prove it's not just another shallow hookup app.

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[Source: Techcrunch]