Features

The best of Kickstarter and Indiegogo for April 2016

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5) Bumprz 2 (from US$20)

Originally released for the iPhone 5, Bumprz are back for Apple’s newer hardware. The so-called ‘anti case’ is effectively four stainless-steel metal corners that you stick on your phone. The theory is they’ll protect your iPhone if you drop it on a corner, and also potentially protect the screen if it lands face-down on a surface that’s fairly flat.

The Kickstarter videos show adorable children and sunset-bathed adults flinging iPhones about, and they reassuringly appear undamaged after the experience. (The iPhones, that is; we’ve no idea if any people were traumatised in the making of this Kickstarter.)

Fund Bumprz 2 on Kickstarter

6) Immersit (from €179)

Modern entertainment systems do their best to immerse you in games and films, largely by pulverising your ears with massive speakers and taking over your entire field of vision with huge displays. But it isn’t enough, according to Immersit, which wants to bring vibrations to your favourite couch, chair, or, oddly, bed.

It works by placing pads under your furniture’s feet, and then syncing movement with supported games or films. The effect seems not unlike arcade games or simulation rides, although we hope not too many Immersit owners end up being flung across the room on smashing into a wall in the latest Need For Speed.

Fund Immersit on Kickstarter

7) Remidi (from US$229)

Imogen Heap’s long been known for performing with the aid of gestural gloves, and Remidi is in a similar space. The glove has sensors in the fingers and palm that trigger custom sounds on a press or respond to gestural input such as tilt and movement.

There’s loads of potential here for fun live performance and recording, although Stuff recommends steering clear of the Kickstarter’s suggestion to have the sensors make contact with “another human”, unless you want to hear the sound of an ungloved fist.

Fund Remidi on Kickstarter

8) Mighty (from US$79)

You might think the Mighty looks an awful lot like an iPod shuffle daubed in Spotify colours, and that’s because it effectively is an iPod shuffle for Spotify.

The thinking is that people now often stream rather than buy music, but that means you need a smartphone to listen to music when exercising, thereby increasing the potential for screen-smashage.

Mighty is essentially a little Android doohickey which sucks down Spotify playlists and related offline audio files from your smartphone, has physical controls, and won’t land you with a hefty repair bill if it goes flying.

Fund Mighty on Kickstarter

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