Sony Bravia KDL-32V2000 review

4 stars
£1,400
How does Sony’s latest LCD rate alongside equally impressive Philips and Panasonic sets?

At Stuff Towers, we’re rather keen on Sony. Over the years, they’ve quenched our gadget thirst with countless products, each one boasting slicker design, greater performance and even more pragmatic consideration than the one before it.

 

So when we heard about the Sony KDL-32V2000 LCD TV, we got a little excited. The revision of what had originally been an award-winning set could only be a good thing, we thought.

Yet, you’ll notice we haven’t awarded the KDL-32V2000 a top grade. But give us a chance to explain…

Welcome black

Let’s start with the bits we like. First off, it paints a cracking picture. Drop in a copy of Batman Begins, and the KDL-32V2000’s tonal range will caress your retinas with its array of dazzling whites and infinite, cavernous blacks.

Your screen will be dressed in microscopically textured scenes, whilst the KDL-32V2000 handles motion as easily as Vanessa Feltz can handle a burger. The Sony consumes fast-paced action sequences with ease, spitting out sharp, deep visuals and keeping swift movements crisp.

The results are even more impressive when you whack in a 1080i disk: vibrant colours leap out from the screen, and the contrast and tone become even more dynamic while managing to subtly avoid overcooking the picture. And it pumps out silky, deep sound too; a concept that many of its rivals of the same size have found difficult to master.

The results are even more impressive when you whack in a 1080i disk: vibrant colours leap out from the screen, and the contrast and tone become even more dynamic while managing to subtly avoid overcooking the picture. And it pumps out silky, deep sound too; a concept that many of its rivals of the same size have found difficult to master.

Runner-up

So why hasn’t the KDL-32V2000 been awarded the full compliment of stars? Well there are two reasons.

Firstly, if you place the KDL-32V2000 side by side with Panasonic’s TX-32LXD600, you’ll find that the marginally thriftier rival projects deeper colours, a more dynamic contrast, and an even cleaner picture. Place the Sony alongside Philip’s 32PF9731D, and you’ll also notice that it can’t offer the same depth of field and texture detail as this pricier product.

And secondly, unlike the Panasonic and the Philips which both offer two HDMI inputs, the Sony only accommodates one.

But we still reckon the KDL-32V2000 is decent TV – hunt around and you’ll be able to bag one for much less than the £1400 list price. If you hook it up to Sky HD, you’ll be hard pressed to find fault in its performance.

Toshiba 32CS3030DB

Hannspree Hannslounge 26

says

Sony Bravia KDL-32V2000

Not the best for the price tag, but a more than competent TV that excels when fed a HD source. One of the best-sounding LCDs we’ve tested, too.
Sony Bravia KDL-32V2000 review
4 stars
£1,400
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