Best next-gen wearable gadgets

In future, all your gadgets will be implants. For now, here’s our pick of the latest generation of wearable tech

Google Project Glass

£tba (due 2014), Google +

Best next-gen wearable gadgets - Google Project Glass 2

Okay, so it’s shamefully uncool to go around town with electronic eyewear on your face. But Google’s hi-tech specs have a camera, touchpad, compass, gyroscope, accelerometer and GPS, while Android device connectivity and voice commands provide hands-free action. Cheating at exams never looked so easy.

Aegis Parka

£tba (concept), Nieuwe Heren

Best next-gen wearable gadgets - Aegis Parka 2

This prototype anti-pollution jacket detects NH3, CO2 and Benzene, lighting you up like a jacket-wearing, LED-studded Christmas tree to display the quality of air you’re chugging. Too much toxic gas activates a respirator that delivers carbon-filtered lungfuls. Best worn with a tinfoil hat and a crazy stare.

More after the break...

Adidas miCoach Pacer Bundle

£100, adidas.com

Best next-gen wearable gadgets - Adidas miCoach Pacer Bundle 2

It’s a widely-documented assumption that motivation is best spurred aurally. The Adidas miCoach Pacer chats to its stride sensor and heart rate monitor before reporting back to your ears with fitness and progress reports. A handy ally in the struggle to look less like a lost walrus on the beach this summer.

Pebble

About US$150, kickstarter.com

Best next-gen wearable gadgets - Pebble 2

The most highly-funded Kickstarter project to date (over US$10m), the Pebble is proof that – despite their unillustrious history – we still want gadget watches to work. It’s too early to say if this E ink-screened, app-driven wristwear will buck the trend, but it’s our best hope yet.

Crosskase Solar 15 backpack

£140, Apple Store

Best next-gen wearable gadgets - Crosskase Solar 15 backpack 2

Since our solar-powered jetpacks have failed to materialise, we’ll have to make do with the Crosskase Solar 15, a backpack fitted with a three-watt photovoltaic panel that trickle charges its battery to give your gadgetry a juice boost when you’re on running on borrowed amps. You can also store them in the water-resistant interior, but – at £140 – this is a gadget bag you really don’t want to lose.

You might also like

Samsung Galaxy Note 2 benchmarks leak

Nintendo 3DS XL video review

Windows Phone 8 release date revealed

You have to login or register to comment.